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khakiscarmel:

An inviting array of Autumn clothing, accompanied by a great old Packard Super Eight.

Some people create their own storms then get upset when it rains.
Unknown (to me)
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thinksquad:

Updated at 11:56 p.m. with more details of tear gas; shots fired

When protesters defied police orders to leave the parking lot of the burned-out QuikTrip, police fired tear gas Monday night after repeated warnings.

Just before midnight, St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson told reporters shots had been fired at Canfield and told the media to go to the command center about a quarter-mile away.

The St. Louis County Police Chief, Jon Belmar, echoed Dotson, telling reporters to move back to the command post because of gunfire. 

 Steven Hawkins, the executive director of Amnesty International, saw the tear gas being fired near QuikTrip. He said the police reacted when protesters wouldn’t leave.

 He could not confirm whether protesters threw rocks at police, but said “even if a few rocks were thrown, it wouldn’t have made a difference. The police are in full body armor.”

Shortly before midnight, police increased their efforts to clear some areas. They used loudspeakers to warn: “You need to disperse immediately. If you are credentialed media, move to your designated area. Do it now.”

11:50 p.m, Steve Giegerich, Ken Leiser

Protests escalated again late Monday night as police fired tear gas at protesters who defied police by refusing orders to disperse, instead gathering in groups near the QuikTrip and other Ferguson spots.

 Police fired at least three tear gas volleys near the QuikTrip as emergency vehicles sped to the scene. Police also used tear gas to break up protesters near West Florissant and Northwoods Estates.

 “They’re gassing our kids,” one protester shouted.

 In front of the McDonald’s restaurant, a tactical united removed a driver from his car at gunpoint. There was no immediate word on why. 

Some protesters also tipped over portable toilets and dragged them into the streets.

11:15 p.m, Steve Giegerich, Ken Leiser, Valerie Hahn

Tear gas fired again in Ferguson

Police fired tear gas on protesters near the QuikTrip late Monday night after they defied officers by gathering and refusing to disperse.

Police also forced a man out of his car at gunpoint about the same time they were firing tear gas.

The standoff at the burned-out convenience store had gone on for more than 20 minutes before the tear gas was deployed.

11:05 p.m. Steve Giegerich

Protesters defied police by gathering in large groups at several spots Monday night, including near the burned out QuikTrip and at West Florissant and Northwind Estates.

Police used a loudspeaker near the QuikTrip and warned about 100 protesters, “If you are standing around on the QuikTrip, you may be subject to arrest.”

 At several points during the night, police warned off protesters by beating the pavement with their night sticks.

Police made some arrests during the night but no official tallies were released. Just before 11 p.m., reporters estimated that the number of protesters was down to about 100.

Valerie Hahn, Ken Leiser, Steve Giegerich, 10:45 p.m.

 A peaceful night took a precarious turn just before 10 p.m. Monday in Ferguson as protesters threw bottles at police, who responded with orders for protesters to clear the streets and high-pitched sound cannons blaring.

Police ordered protesters, “Back off now!” and told them to clear the streets immediately.

Things turned tense when a group of protesters marched toward a police line and stopped, defying the night-long orders for all protesters to keep moving. Police put on their helmets and seemed prepared for a confrontation.

 An armored vehicle moved down the street trying to clear the crowd, and some pastors in the street stood with their arms locked trying to restore peace. They helped to move protesters away from the police line. 

 Pastor Michael McBride said he helped calm the protester before police deployed tear gas by talking to the protesters.

"We put our arms around them and whispered that we love them," he said.

10:10 p.m, Steve Giegerich, Valerie Hahn

Shools will stay closed all week

The Ferguson-Florissant School District announced Monday night that its schools would stay closed for the rest of the week.

 “We believe that closing schools for the rest of this week will allow needed time for peace and stability to be restored to our community,” the district said in a statement.

 The district said it would hold the first day of classes on Monday, Aug. 25.

9:10 p.m. Monday, staff

As darkness fell Monday night, police increased their effort to keep protesters moving — politely telling protesters they needed to keep moving.

One protester asked pointedly “Did they tell the people supporting the cop downtown to keep moving?” referring to a Sunday evening gathering in support of Officer Darren Wilson.

But the crowd, smaller than Sunday night, was staying on the sidewalk and obeying officers’ orders to keep moving. At 9 p.m., the protests remained peaceful. 

 One protester was arrested in front of the McDonald’s after 9 p.m., for failure to disperse, police said. When the officers walked him off, a group of protesters followed along.

Carmelita Wiliams came from Dellwood to join the protests. She said she plans to be out for as many nights as it takes.

"If one person is left, I want to be with that person," she said.

Another protester, Allysha Hamber, 42, asked how her sons can stand fight for America, “but I can’t stand on sidewalk and protest?”

In a related development, a federal judge Monday night denied a motion by the American Civil Liberties Union for a temporary restraining order to stop police from requiring people to keep moving on sidewalks and thoroughfares in Ferguson unless they’re gathered in a designated protest area.

8:20 p.m. Monday Steve Giegerich, Valerie Hahn, and Margaret Gillerman.

Press Club condemns treatment of journalists in Ferguson

 The Press Club of Metropolitan St. Louis on Monday condemned the treatment of journalists covering the Ferguson crisis and said they should be able to freely cover the news.

"We strongly condemn the manhandling and disrespect shown to our colleagues by authorities during the unfolding crisis in Ferguson, Mo.," the group said in a statement. "We believe these actions should cease, and that those responsible for maintaining order in Ferguson establish and enforce rules to assure the safety of our journalistic colleagues."

8 p.m, Margaret Gillerman

Police kept protesters on the move Monday night, telling anyone who stopped in a parking lot or street to keep moving.

Reporters were included in the keep-moving mandate by police, who shooed  them off the parking lot at the McDonald’s restaurant. Police officers walking the scene carried riot gear and big sticks

Highway Patrol troopers on the scene had zip ties — which are used as handcuffs — attached to their belts. They told motorists driving through the area to be careful.

 Some protesters bought roses and bottled water from the Family Dollar store, then handed the roses out to peaceful demonstrators.

http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/metro/police-keeping-protesters-on-the-move-in-ferguson-national-guard/article_f794b446-1ee7-56f1-b4f5-03c5663b596f.html

thinksquad:

Updated at 11:56 p.m. with more details of tear gas; shots fired

When protesters defied police orders to leave the parking lot of the burned-out QuikTrip, police fired tear gas Monday night after repeated warnings.

Just before midnight, St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson told reporters shots had been fired at Canfield and told the media to go to the command center about a quarter-mile away.

The St. Louis County Police Chief, Jon Belmar, echoed Dotson, telling reporters to move back to the command post because of gunfire.

Steven Hawkins, the executive director of Amnesty International, saw the tear gas being fired near QuikTrip. He said the police reacted when protesters wouldn’t leave.

He could not confirm whether protesters threw rocks at police, but said “even if a few rocks were thrown, it wouldn’t have made a difference. The police are in full body armor.”

Shortly before midnight, police increased their efforts to clear some areas. They used loudspeakers to warn: “You need to disperse immediately. If you are credentialed media, move to your designated area. Do it now.”

11:50 p.m, Steve Giegerich, Ken Leiser

Protests escalated again late Monday night as police fired tear gas at protesters who defied police by refusing orders to disperse, instead gathering in groups near the QuikTrip and other Ferguson spots.

Police fired at least three tear gas volleys near the QuikTrip as emergency vehicles sped to the scene. Police also used tear gas to break up protesters near West Florissant and Northwoods Estates.

“They’re gassing our kids,” one protester shouted.

In front of the McDonald’s restaurant, a tactical united removed a driver from his car at gunpoint. There was no immediate word on why.

Some protesters also tipped over portable toilets and dragged them into the streets.

11:15 p.m, Steve Giegerich, Ken Leiser, Valerie Hahn

Tear gas fired again in Ferguson

Police fired tear gas on protesters near the QuikTrip late Monday night after they defied officers by gathering and refusing to disperse.

Police also forced a man out of his car at gunpoint about the same time they were firing tear gas.

The standoff at the burned-out convenience store had gone on for more than 20 minutes before the tear gas was deployed.

11:05 p.m. Steve Giegerich

Protesters defied police by gathering in large groups at several spots Monday night, including near the burned out QuikTrip and at West Florissant and Northwind Estates.

Police used a loudspeaker near the QuikTrip and warned about 100 protesters, “If you are standing around on the QuikTrip, you may be subject to arrest.”

At several points during the night, police warned off protesters by beating the pavement with their night sticks.

Police made some arrests during the night but no official tallies were released. Just before 11 p.m., reporters estimated that the number of protesters was down to about 100.

Valerie Hahn, Ken Leiser, Steve Giegerich, 10:45 p.m.

A peaceful night took a precarious turn just before 10 p.m. Monday in Ferguson as protesters threw bottles at police, who responded with orders for protesters to clear the streets and high-pitched sound cannons blaring.

Police ordered protesters, “Back off now!” and told them to clear the streets immediately.

Things turned tense when a group of protesters marched toward a police line and stopped, defying the night-long orders for all protesters to keep moving. Police put on their helmets and seemed prepared for a confrontation.

An armored vehicle moved down the street trying to clear the crowd, and some pastors in the street stood with their arms locked trying to restore peace. They helped to move protesters away from the police line.

Pastor Michael McBride said he helped calm the protester before police deployed tear gas by talking to the protesters.

"We put our arms around them and whispered that we love them," he said.

10:10 p.m, Steve Giegerich, Valerie Hahn

Shools will stay closed all week

The Ferguson-Florissant School District announced Monday night that its schools would stay closed for the rest of the week.

“We believe that closing schools for the rest of this week will allow needed time for peace and stability to be restored to our community,” the district said in a statement.

The district said it would hold the first day of classes on Monday, Aug. 25.

9:10 p.m. Monday, staff

As darkness fell Monday night, police increased their effort to keep protesters moving — politely telling protesters they needed to keep moving.

One protester asked pointedly “Did they tell the people supporting the cop downtown to keep moving?” referring to a Sunday evening gathering in support of Officer Darren Wilson.

But the crowd, smaller than Sunday night, was staying on the sidewalk and obeying officers’ orders to keep moving. At 9 p.m., the protests remained peaceful.

One protester was arrested in front of the McDonald’s after 9 p.m., for failure to disperse, police said. When the officers walked him off, a group of protesters followed along.

Carmelita Wiliams came from Dellwood to join the protests. She said she plans to be out for as many nights as it takes.

"If one person is left, I want to be with that person," she said.

Another protester, Allysha Hamber, 42, asked how her sons can stand fight for America, “but I can’t stand on sidewalk and protest?”

In a related development, a federal judge Monday night denied a motion by the American Civil Liberties Union for a temporary restraining order to stop police from requiring people to keep moving on sidewalks and thoroughfares in Ferguson unless they’re gathered in a designated protest area.

8:20 p.m. Monday Steve Giegerich, Valerie Hahn, and Margaret Gillerman.

Press Club condemns treatment of journalists in Ferguson

The Press Club of Metropolitan St. Louis on Monday condemned the treatment of journalists covering the Ferguson crisis and said they should be able to freely cover the news.

"We strongly condemn the manhandling and disrespect shown to our colleagues by authorities during the unfolding crisis in Ferguson, Mo.," the group said in a statement. "We believe these actions should cease, and that those responsible for maintaining order in Ferguson establish and enforce rules to assure the safety of our journalistic colleagues."

8 p.m, Margaret Gillerman

Police kept protesters on the move Monday night, telling anyone who stopped in a parking lot or street to keep moving.

Reporters were included in the keep-moving mandate by police, who shooed them off the parking lot at the McDonald’s restaurant. Police officers walking the scene carried riot gear and big sticks

Highway Patrol troopers on the scene had zip ties — which are used as handcuffs — attached to their belts. They told motorists driving through the area to be careful.

Some protesters bought roses and bottled water from the Family Dollar store, then handed the roses out to peaceful demonstrators.


http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/metro/police-keeping-protesters-on-the-move-in-ferguson-national-guard/article_f794b446-1ee7-56f1-b4f5-03c5663b596f.html

Anonymous
asks:
I bet those people you've mentioned are also wondering, "why does the United States intervene in my country's issues, when they can't fix their own?"

deadpresidents:

Exactly. The country that decides it is their job to police the world can’t even police their own police. A frightening thought.

socimages:

Julie Chen reveals why she underwent “Westernizing” plastic surgery.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
Eyelid surgery is the third most common cosmetic procedure in the world.  Some are necessary for drooping eyelids interfere with vision, others are undertaken in order to enable people to look younger, but many people choose these surgeries to make their eyes look more Western or whiter, a characteristic often conflated with attractiveness.
Recently Julie Chen — a TV personality and news anchor — revealed that she had undergone eyelid and other surgeries almost 20 years ago in order to comply with the standards of beauty and “relatability” demanded of her bosses.  She released the photos above in tandem with the story.
Chen said that she was torn about whether to get the surgeries.  Her entire family got involved in the conversation and they split, too, arguing about whether the surgeries represented a rejection of her Chinese ancestry.
Ultimately, though, Chen was under a lot of pressure from her bosses.  One told her “you will never be on this anchor desk, because your Chinese.” He went on:

Let’s face it, Julie, how relatable are you to our community? How big of an Asian community do we have in Dayton? ‘On top of that, because of your heritage, because of your Asian eyes, sometimes I’ve noticed when you’re on camera and you’re interviewing someone, you look disinterested, you look bored.

Another man, a “big time agent,” told her: “I cannot represent you in less you get plastic surgery to make your eyes look bigger.”
While cosmetic surgeries are often portrayed as vanity projects, Chen’s story reveals that they are also often about looking “right” in a competitive industry. Whether it’s erotic dancers getting breast implants, waitresses getting facelifts, or aspiring news anchors getting eyelid surgery, often economic pressures — mixed with racism and sexism — drive these decisions.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

Julie Chen reveals why she underwent “Westernizing” plastic surgery.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

Eyelid surgery is the third most common cosmetic procedure in the world.  Some are necessary for drooping eyelids interfere with vision, others are undertaken in order to enable people to look younger, but many people choose these surgeries to make their eyes look more Western or whiter, a characteristic often conflated with attractiveness.

Recently Julie Chen — a TV personality and news anchor — revealed that she had undergone eyelid and other surgeries almost 20 years ago in order to comply with the standards of beauty and “relatability” demanded of her bosses.  She released the photos above in tandem with the story.

Chen said that she was torn about whether to get the surgeries.  Her entire family got involved in the conversation and they split, too, arguing about whether the surgeries represented a rejection of her Chinese ancestry.

Ultimately, though, Chen was under a lot of pressure from her bosses.  One told her “you will never be on this anchor desk, because your Chinese.” He went on:

Let’s face it, Julie, how relatable are you to our community? How big of an Asian community do we have in Dayton? ‘On top of that, because of your heritage, because of your Asian eyes, sometimes I’ve noticed when you’re on camera and you’re interviewing someone, you look disinterested, you look bored.

Another man, a “big time agent,” told her: “I cannot represent you in less you get plastic surgery to make your eyes look bigger.”

While cosmetic surgeries are often portrayed as vanity projects, Chen’s story reveals that they are also often about looking “right” in a competitive industry. Whether it’s erotic dancers getting breast implants, waitresses getting facelifts, or aspiring news anchors getting eyelid surgery, often economic pressures — mixed with racism and sexism — drive these decisions.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

cabbagerose:

little blue house/lasc studio

via: youaretheriver

thoughts of a goldfish
  • goldfish:

    nice rock

  • goldfish:

    nice rock

  • goldfish:

    nice rock

  • goldfish:

    nice rock

  • goldfish:

    The country’s economy and labor market remain in deep disrepair. Whereas our various post-market institutions (e.g., the safety net, educational institutions, health institutions) have a mixed record of coping with the rising poverty and inequality that has been handed to them by a still-struggling economy and labor market.

  • goldfish:

    nice rock

haveitjoeway:

FUCK

haveitjoeway:

FUCK